Climb Snowdon using public transport

Climb Snowdon using public transport

Photo © Efan Thomas

Are you looking to Climb Snowdon but don’t have access to a car or would simply just prefer to use public transport? Well it’s actually quite easy to start your Snowdon walk using local buses.

The Snowdon Sherpa is a unique bus service that travels around the foot of Snowdon. It creates an essential connection between the six main paths up Snowdon as well as the main car parks, villages and tourist attractions in the area. It’s particularly useful for walkers or climbers wanting to start their journey from one place and finish at another, or indeed for anyone who wants to travel around Snowdonia leaving the car at home.

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Do I need walking boots to climb Snowdon?

Do I need walking boots to climb Snowdon?

What to wear on your feet when you’re climbing Snowdon is a common question we get asked here at MountainXperience so we’d thought we put together a blog post with some useful information.

Each of Snowdon’s six main footpaths are well looked after by Snowdonia National Park and charitable bodies such as the Snowdonia Society. The paths are built to withstand the traffic and are regularly maintained throughout the year. With around three-quarters of a million hikers walking the paths each year, they certainly have to be! However don’t be expecting smooth, tarmac paths to the summit. Snowdon’s footpaths are a mixture of shale, scree and rocks.

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Snowdon Summit Weather

Snowdon Summit Weather

If you’re planning to climb Snowdon in the coming days it’s essential you know what the weather’s going to be like at the summit. Checking the mountain weather forecast before setting off will ensure you have the right gear for the day or might even lead you to change your plans altogether.

It’s important to understand how mountain weather differs from the weather we experience in the valleys. Very simply we would expect the temperature to drop by 1°C for every 100m we climb. Snowdon is over 1000m high so typically the temperature will be around 10°C colder at the top than when you started. That’s before we add in any other factors such as wind chill.

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​What should I wear to climb a mountain?

What should I wear to climb a mountain?

Asking what you should wear on a mountain day is probably the question our guides get asked most often and that’s because getting it wrong can at best spoil your day and in the worst case scenario lead to much worse. But it’s really not that difficult if you follow a few simple rules. This guide is aimed at those new to mountain walking who might be venturing out on their first  climb a mountain day.

It’s good to remember that there’s no need to spend a fortune on top-end outdoor clothing. You’ll see people out in the mountains wearing waterproof jackets that cost £400+ and they are really good if you’re going to be spending day after day outdoors working in the rain. For most people the raincoat you’ve got in the cupboard will likely do you just fine.

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Snowdon accommodation

Snowdon Accommodation

If you’re booked on one of our Climb Snowdon, Snowdon Sunrise or Snowdon Horseshoe adventures and you’re looking for accommodation in the area, we’ve compiled a list of local hotels, bed and breakfasts and campsites to help you with your visit.

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What’s the easiest way up Snowdon?

What’s the easiest way up Snowdon?

Snowdon (known locally by its Welsh name Yr Wyddfa) is the highest mountain in Wales at 1085m (3,560ft) above sea level. It’s actually taller than any mountain in England too. In fact you’ll have to head up to the Scottish Highlands to find something bigger in the British Isles. Probably the most common question that gets asked around here is “Which is the easiest path up Snowdon?” So we’d like to share with you our guide to Snowdon’s main footpaths ranked in order of difficulty from the easiest to the most difficult.

Whilst there’s a small difference between the lengths of the paths (the Llanberis Path being the longest and the Pyg Track being the shortest) it’s not a huge amount so don’t look at distance alone. All the paths take roughly the same time with a faster walker being able to get up and down in around four hours but for most people, allow six or slightly longer if you’re walking with young children or in poor weather.

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What smart phone apps can improve my mountain day?

What smart phone apps can improve my mountain day?

The smart phone has become an essential part of all our lives and that’s no less true when we’re out exploring the hills and mountains. We’re very used to taking summit selfies and calling our loved ones when we’re safely on our way home but there are also some amazing apps available to make your mountain day easier, more enjoyable and they could even save your life. Here’s a few of our recommendations:

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